Trent Bridge / Seasons

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Trent Bridge

1946

1946 Team 1946

 

The Committee’s Report
The first post-war cricket season has been disappointing, but it has had many encouraging features. The Club played 26 matches, winning 6, losing 8, drawing 12 and finished 13th in the County Championship.
In the early part of the season the team showed, in spite of the shortage of a spin bowler, that it could challenge the most formidable of opponents and weather robbed them of several victories, but from the beginning of August until the end of the season there was nothing but disappointment, and not a point was gained. Batsmen of high reputation lost their form, and far too many catches were dropped. This we hope may be but a temporary phase.
In batting Walter Keeton stood out head and shoulders above the rest and played better than he had ever played. Not only did he make over 2,000 runs in first class cricket (a notable feat in such wet weather), but he made them with a brilliancy and speed which delighted all who saw him. It is Walter’s benefit this year and it is hoped that the public of Nottinghamshire will generously recognise his great services to the club.
Joe Hardstaff had a disappointing season, but his many admirers feel that this is but a temporary loss of form and we shall see many more of his sparkling centuries in the future. Chris Harris obtained over 1,000 runs and G F H Heane and T B Reddick only just missed doing so.
Harold Butler bowled exceedingly well at times, but Malaria, which he contracted on active service in the Far East, and strains, handicapped him. Given good health and fitness Harold will prove himself one of the best fat bowlers in the country. Jepson bore the brunt of the attack in most stout-hearted fashion, and his figures would have been better had he been supported by more efficient fielding.
In fielding the captain R T Simpson, Stocks, G L Wiffatt, Hardstaff, Keeton and T B Reddick all did well, but in the slips, catches were dropped with depressing regularity. This must be remedied.
Whilst making an uncertain start in the early part of the season Meads was keeping wicket before the close in the good form that he displayed in 1939.
An encouraging feature was the first season’s play of F W Stocks. He made a century in his first match, and he played many innings that showed great promise for the future. W Voce was only available for a few matches. He had not played first class cricket since 1939, and did not have time to get into his old form. R T Simpson will be available for the forthcoming season. He showed by a fine innings of 201 against Warwickshire that he has great batting ability and when he has gained more experience in first class cricket should reach high rank. His fielding is a pleasure to watch.
Turning to the accounts you will see that there is a small surplus on the gross workings of £248-0-6. This has been made possible by the generous action of several members, organized by Capt, John Farr, who gave the sum of £1,250 to wipe out the club’s overdraft. This action was followed by other members of the club, who donated further sums amounting to £517. It should be pointed out that in addition, thousands of pounds expenditure is required to restore the stands, seating and equipment at Trent Bridge to pre-war condition when permitted.
Membership amounts to 3,544 compared to 3,147 in the year 1939. There was gratifying support from members of the public when the weather permitted. There is little doubt that had the summer of 1946 been normal we should have had an increase in membership and attendances which would have improved our finances by many thousands of pounds.
Recently, the pay of all staff has been increased to bring it more into line with present conditions. It should be pointed out that the expenses for 1946 amounted to £17859-4-4, and will be more in the future. The continued support of all cricket lovers is therefore more essential than ever if we are to hold our own as a first class county.

The Committee’s Report

The first post-war cricket season has been disappointing, but it has had many encouraging features. The Club played 26 matches, winning 6, losing 8, drawing 12 and finished 13th in the County Championship.

In the early part of the season the team showed, in spite of the shortage of a spin bowler, that it could challenge the most formidable of opponents and weather robbed them of several victories, but from the beginning of August until the end of the season there was nothing but disappointment, and not a point was gained. Batsmen of high reputation lost their form, and far too many catches were dropped. This we hope may be but a temporary phase.

In batting Walter Keeton stood out head and shoulders above the rest and played better than he had ever played. Not only did he make over 2,000 runs in first class cricket (a notable feat in such wet weather), but he made them with a brilliancy and speed which delighted all who saw him. It is Walter’s benefit this year and it is hoped that the public of Nottinghamshire will generously recognise his great services to the club.

Joe Hardstaff had a disappointing season, but his many admirers feel that this is but a temporary loss of form and we shall see many more of his sparkling centuries in the future. Chris Harris obtained over 1,000 runs and G F H Heane and T B Reddick only just missed doing so.

Harold Butler bowled exceedingly well at times, but Malaria, which he contracted on active service in the Far East, and strains, handicapped him. Given good health and fitness Harold will prove himself one of the best fat bowlers in the country. Jepson bore the brunt of the attack in most stout-hearted fashion, and his figures would have been better had he been supported by more efficient fielding.

In fielding the captain R T Simpson, Stocks, G L Wiffatt, Hardstaff, Keeton and T B Reddick all did well, but in the slips, catches were dropped with depressing regularity. This must be remedied.

Whilst making an uncertain start in the early part of the season Meads was keeping wicket before the close in the good form that he displayed in 1939.

An encouraging feature was the first season’s play of F W Stocks. He made a century in his first match, and he played many innings that showed great promise for the future. W Voce was only available for a few matches. He had not played first class cricket since 1939, and did not have time to get into his old form. R T Simpson will be available for the forthcoming season. He showed by a fine innings of 201 against Warwickshire that he has great batting ability and when he has gained more experience in first class cricket should reach high rank. His fielding is a pleasure to watch.

Turning to the accounts you will see that there is a small surplus on the gross workings of £248-0-6. This has been made possible by the generous action of several members, organized by Capt, John Farr, who gave the sum of £1,250 to wipe out the club’s overdraft. This action was followed by other members of the club, who donated further sums amounting to £517. It should be pointed out that in addition, thousands of pounds expenditure is required to restore the stands, seating and equipment at Trent Bridge to pre-war condition when permitted.

Membership amounts to 3,544 compared to 3,147 in the year 1939. There was gratifying support from members of the public when the weather permitted. There is little doubt that had the summer of 1946 been normal we should have had an increase in membership and attendances which would have improved our finances by many thousands of pounds.

Recently, the pay of all staff has been increased to bring it more into line with present conditions. It should be pointed out that the expenses for 1946 amounted to £17859-4-4, and will be more in the future. The continued support of all cricket lovers is therefore more essential than ever if we are to hold our own as a first class county.

 

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